State by State Data

National Child Health Chartbook

This chartbook, America's Health Starts With Healthy Children: How Do States Compare?, examines the health of children from different socioeconomic backgrounds in every state to document how healthy our nation's children are now and how healthy they could be if we as a nation were realizing our full health potential.

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State Comparison Charts

  • Gaps in Children’s General Health Status by Family Income: How Do States Compare?

    Comparing states based on the size of the gap in children’s general health status by income reveals unrealized health potential among babies, both at the national level and in every state.

  • Gaps in Children’s General Health Status by Family Income: How Do States Compare?

    Although the size of the state-level gaps in children’s general health status varies markedly across the United States, there is unrealized health potential among children in every state.

  • Gaps in Infant Mortality Rates by Mother’s Education: How Do States Compare?

    Although the size of the state-level gaps in infant mortality by mother’s education varies markedly across the United States, there is unrealized health potential among babies in every state.

  • Gaps in Infant Mortality Rates by Mother’s Education: How Do States Compare?

    Comparing states based on the size of the gap in infant mortality by mother’s education reveals unrealized health potential among babies, both at the national level and in every state.

  • Health-Related Behaviors and Income Matter for Children’s Health

    Differences in children’s general health status occur across social groups, but also depend on health-related behaviors in families. At every income level, children in families where someone smokes and no one exercises regularly are more likely to be in less than optimal health than their peers in families with healthier behaviors.

  • United States: Gaps in Children’s General Health Status

    Overall in the United States, children’s general health status varies by family income and education and by racial or ethnic group. Children in the least-advantaged groups typically experience the worst health, but even children in middle-class families are less healthy than those with greater advantages.

  • United States: Gaps in Infant Mortality

    Infant mortality rates – a key indicator of overall health – vary by mother’s education and racial or ethnic group nationally.

  • United States: Social Factors Affecting Children’s Health

    In the United States, health during childhood is powerfully linked with social factors, including the income and education levels of a child’s family and his or her racial or ethnic group.

  • Income Is Linked With Health Regardless of Racial or Ethnic Group

    For children in the United States, differences in general health status by income do not simply reflect differences by race or ethnicity. Both income and racial or ethnic group are important for health.

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